May 132015

Fulfilling a lifetime dream

My most recent trip was to a destination I had wanted to see all my life: the remote Easter Island (Rapa Nui). This island has captured the imagination of more than one photographer and it had been on my bucket list of must-see places for a very long time. Typically, because of its remoteness (and expense) this is not a trip that one does often, so I wanted to be ready to capture the beauty of the island without compromise. Rather than traveling with my most used lenses I decided this time I had to bring along my whole collection and two bodies: my full frame  Canon EOS 5D Mark III and my crop Canon EOS 7D. Having a second body is not strictly necessary, but I wanted to be ready in case anything happened to my main camera. I contacted my friends at Think Tank Photo who asked me to provide a list of the equipment I was taking along as well as a description of what type of travel I was planning to do (hiking, not checking any luggage with the airlines). After a few days they recommended and provided one of their bags: the Airport Accelerator V2.


Stylish and well designed

The bag arrived in just 3 days in a well packed box. My first impression was of a sturdy well-designed bag, somewhat light and slightly large. It would definitely fit on the overhead bin of the plane, but a nice surprise would come later. A little side pocket on the top contains a steel wire with lock, a definite bonus for those who seek extra safety, handles on two sides (those who read my article “Get Your Gear Home Safely” on the Popular Photography May 2013 issue know I’m a big fan of handles, they extend the life of the bag greatly when checked with an airline) and straps that turn the carry-on bag into a backpack; these straps also have ever-useful “D” rings. The back is very well padded and seats well against my back as I hike. There are two zippered compartments for laptop, tablets, cables, etc. plus the main compartment for 2 camera bodies and a whole assortment of lenses. The main compartment has 3 zippered  pockets which I used for business card holder, postcards, extra memory cards in their original packaging, pens, markers and more. Other than the two cameras I brought along the following Canon lenses: EF 10-24mm L, EF 15mm L fisheye, 100mm L Macro, EF 100-400 L, EF 50mm and a Rokinon 14mm which I had just received but never tested. I also had a GoPro Hero 4 Black with an assortment of accessories, remote timer for the cameras, several filters, egg cooking timer (useful for time lapses with the GoPro), a lens/sensor cleaning kit, 4 batteries, charger, a lot more cables that I can count, 1 laptop and 2 tablets. The bag also contained a waterproof cover which fortunately I didn’t get to use. Everything fit comfortably inside it. Outside there’s also a pouch for a small tripod (which I used) and comes with two straps to hold the tripod in place on the top end.


The Airport Accelerator fits under the seat of a plane. Bonus!

By the time it was zipped up and locked (the main compartment and secondary can be locked with a separate lock; I always keep spare combination TSA approved locks around) its weight was about 35 lbs/16 Kg, definitely more than I wanted to carry on my shoulders but for this journey well worth the effort.

The first tests were at the airport: the full bag went through the TSA scanner without a  glitch. My first flight out of Jackson Hole, Wyoming was on a regional jet (those with a small overhead bin, because of which, larger carry-ons won’t fit and have to be “valet” checked to the door of the plane at destination). The big surprise here was that my Airport Accelerator actually fit (tripod removed) under the seat in front of me, and that made me a lot less anxious about the rest of the flights (3 flight to reach Santiago plus a fourth one 4 days later to reach Rapa Nui).

_MG_5823After Easter Island I flew to Sardinia, Italy which took another 5 flights, were the pack was brought on the plane as carry-on. In Sardinia I lightened up its weight and took it on a long steep hike through the hilly countryside. Regardless of the scorching sun, the Airport Accelerator felt very comfortable on my shoulders.

My back suffered a bit from the heavy weight of the backpack while on Easter Island, but as I said, I really overdid it, add to this that I’m 5’6″. The backpack is very comfortable and padded in all the right places and if anything it alleviated the pain. I don’t think I would carry a full pack on a long mountain hike (I should rent a yak for that), and it was not designed with that purpose in mind, but for trips with mixed transportation were there isn’t a lot of non-stop walking involved this backpack would be my first choice.


Fits well under the seat of a United Airlines plane.





Click the link to access my affiliate ThinkTank page.




Mar 162012

Stay tuned for reviews of the Pelican Storm Case i2600, ThinkTankPhoto Flight AT camera roller, Mountainsmith Borealis AT Day Pack, Wacom Intuos5 tablet and Nik Software Silver Efex Pro 2.

Mar 042010

(Discount Coupon Available Below)

In photography and Image Processing HDR (High Dynamic Range) is a technique that allows a much greater range of light intensity from the lightest to the darkest area of an image than a regular image produced by a common camera. Tone mapping techniques aim to reduce the overall contrast so that an image with greater luminosity range can be displayed on devices that are not capable of showing that range while, at the same time, maintaining localized contrast. This can also be exaggerated in order to create artistic effects.
True high dynamic range photos can be obtained by capturing multiple shots of the same scene with different exposures  and merging them in a software like HDRSoft’s Photomatix. This is what I use for all my HDR needs.

Now, I can already hear some of you groaning: “HDR looks so fake…” – Well, it doesn’t have to. As a matter of fact, HDR can look as real as human eye can see (remember that our eyes can see by far a much greater contrast than the sensor of the best camera in the market), or as artistic as you want it to be. In my experience as a photographer I came across all sort of HDR/Tone Mapped images and I can guarantee you that a job well done cannot be always told apart from non-HDR/Tone Mapped images.

There were times when a photographer would have to give up a particular shot (or be very creative about it) because the light just wasn’t right. Your classic example would be a dark interior with bright light coming from the windows: you want to show the interior as well as the scenery outside of the windows but the sensor of your camera (or the film) cannot resolve such a high contrast; it’s either one or the other. Photoshop has many times come to our help: if the contrast isn’t excessive we could create an adjustment layer and modify highlights, shadows, etc. in a particular area of the image. In case of excessive contrast, though, that technique can only get a close approximation to reality, I’m saying a close approximation because for as powerful as it is, Photoshop cannot create data that is not there, the missing highlights were not captured in the first place, and the part of the image that is too dark cannot be lightened over a certain amount or it will become highly noisy. Landscape photographers face scenes with high contrast all the time and many times we have been able to overcome this problem by using a split neutral density filter. Unfortunately it only works when there is a net distinction between the dark side and the bright side of the image, as when we are taking the photo of a sunset over the sea. Suppose you want to shoot a “tunnel” created by a canopy of trees where the ground is dark, the canopy itself is brighter and the “end of the tunnel” is really bright; or maybe you want to shoot the movement of the waves under a boardwalk. Fortunately, for these and many other situations, HDR software comes to our help. There are many programs out there, and even Photoshop CS4 can merge to an HDR image (with a serious lack of options and a serious lack of speed), but in my opinion the best one in the market is Photomatix. I don’t want to get into fine details because the web abounds of reviews of this excellent program as well as tutorials so let’s just take a look at some of the features…

First of all, Photomatix is very easy to use, you can actually drag and drop images in its interface and with just a few clicks that don’t require anything more than following on-screen instructions you get your first HDR image. For the power users, though, the possibilities are nearly endless. There are so many ways to tweak you final results that you could spend hours playing with it (and you probably will).
The program comes as a stand-alone as well as plug-ins for Photoshop CS2, CS3, CS4, Lightroom and Aperture. At the start-up of the stand-alone application we are presented with an empty window and a small menu window (the Workflow Shortcuts window). Click on “Generate HDR image” or “Exposure Fusion” then browse and select or drag & drop the images that you want to use (these can be either RAW or JPEG). In the next step we choose if we want to align hand-held images and how (I find that the option “matching features” gives better results); Reduce Noise and Chromatic Aberrations, Reduce Ghosting Artifacts (in case you have movement in the images, like leaves); and then some more options that are specific to JPEG or RAW. We click OK and let the software work. After some time which varies on the complexity and size of the image, the file format, and how powerful your computer is, we are shown a preliminary version to which we will apply Tone Mapping using standard setting or customizing any or all of the many options available. After playing with the interface for a while we can create a pretty realistic scene. We can also save a lot of time with the Batch Processing interface that is filled with options ranging from the number of exposures to the Color Profile and a lot more.
As I mentioned, the software can do an alignment of multiple exposures for hand-held shots. I prefer to use a tripod, but it’s not always possible and the results I’ve seen with the automatic alignment are great.

Photomatix comes both in 32 bit and 64 bit versions for Windows and Mac. The 64 bit version naturally only runs in 64 bit Operating Systems. A 32 bit Operating System can only address up to 3 GB of RAM because of physical limitations that cannot be overcome. If you want to use 4GB of RAM or more you need to use a 64 bit version of the OS or this will see the amount of memory but will not be able to address it. My main computer is a custom built PC with Windows 7 64bit and Photomatix 64bit runs flawlessly on it. If you are upgrading your PC from XP or Vista to 7, the good news is that the upgrade DVD contains both versions. As with all upgrades there might be some incompatibilities between old 32bit software and a 64bit OS but so far (and I was a beta tester of Windows 7 64bit since July 2009) I have found none; even Photoshop CS4 and Lightroom 2.0 come with 32 bit and 64 bit versions. On the plus side, if you have more than 3GB of RAM your PC will always run at the very least a bit faster in the 64bit version. Personally, I don’t think photographers and video editors should be allowed to use 32bit Operating Systems :)

These are the version of Photomatix and Plug-ins available for sale:

Photomatix Light is a stand-alone program which allows the merging of bracketed exposures into one single image with Tone Mapping or Exposure Fusion and also does an automatic alignment of hand-held photos.

Plug-In for Photoshop CS2, CS3, CS4 provides a tone mapping method for this well known Adobe software.

Photomatix Plug-In for Aperture 2.1 or higher provides HDR Tone Mapping, automatic alignment of hand-held photos, and options for reduction of noise and chromatic aberrations in HDR images.

Photomatix Pro is a stand-alone program with options for Exposure Fusion, HDR Tone Mapping, Automatic Alignment of hand-held photos, reduction of ghosting, noise and chromatic aberration in HDR images, Batch processing and includes an Adobe Photoshop Lightroom plug-in. It can also convert a single RAW image into a pseudo-HDR image with Tone Mapping and an option to modify the White Balance.

Photomatix Pro Plus Bundle includes Photomatix Pro as well as the Photoshop and Aperture plug-ins.

HDRSoft has agree to provide a 15% Discount using coupon code:  LucaDianaPhoto


The three original Exposures

This is the final result optimized in Photoshop for contrast in the windows

HDR Tone Mapped from 3 Exposures on tripod

HDR Tone Mapping Final Result 3 exposures

Exposure Fusion of 3 images


Jan 292010

Hiking is a big part of the landscape and wildlife photographer’s life and mine but this means that we often return home with lower back pain and a chafed neck caused by the camera strap. I also find annoying having the camera hitting me  repeatedly in the stomach while I walk with the strap around my neck. My old Minolta 9Xi suffered major scratches from constantly hitting my belt. Some time ago I purchased a camera backpack which does the job of easing the carrying part, but what if the situation arises when you need your camera quickly in your hands? Take the backpack off your back, open it, remove the camera, watch the critter go, place the camera in the backpack, wear it again and keep hiking without that unique shot. I’m sure this situation is familiar to many photographers.

Fortunately, the smart people at Cotton Carrier thought of a system that allows for the camera to be in the near-ready position at all times and reducing the fatigue from carrying it around your neck. The system consists of a vest that wears comfortably under or on top of any other garment and can be fitted with a side holster (sold separately or as part of a package) that allows for carrying a second camera. I often hike with two cameras: my Canon 5D Mark II fitted with the 24-105 L and the Canon 50D (soon to be replaced by the 7D) with the 100-400 L, in this case the side holster is a welcome addition. For the times when I’m only interested in shooting landscape, I can remove the holster or, using a rubber band, I can even use it to carry a small bottle of water.
I took the Cotton Carrier out for a few test hikes and I was immediately surprised by how well it distributes the weight around the shoulders/upper back area. The vest, actually, is streamlined enough to allow the use of a backpack on top of it. For my test hikes I picked a variety of terrain: flat, uphill, downhill, in thick brush, off-trail and rocky. In all these situations the Cotton Carrier revealed itself to be of great help. In some of them, like hiking on rocky uphill terrain off the trail I’d say it was nearly essential. Not only could I stop worrying about my camera swinging around, but I was able to use both my hands to gain a solid grip on the rocks while ascending. On flat terrain I also took a test run, jogging moderately without touching the camera to see if the carrier would come in handy in that situation. Every once in a while I find myself having to run from a spot to another with the camera strap around my neck while holding it by the lens. Needless to say after a few yards the fun is over. Not only was I able to run faster with the Cotton Carrier but the weight of the camera was once again greatly minimized.
The system comes in black only, the new model has just been upgraded with a hard anodized aluminum hub (the part that gets screwed at the base of the camera) and at first is a little hard to lock but the company has informed me that after 20 or so ins and outs it will slide more smoothly; which in my experience turned out to be true . The package comes with an instruction sheet (with photos) for a step by step set-up as well as a care and maintenance sheet. It took me only minutes to set it all up and adjust it to my body without even taking a look at the instructions (but do make sure that the arrows marked on the hub points in the right direction). The vest will fit a small person as well as a large one as the straps and Velcro are highly adjustable. The system is covered by a 1 year warranty against manufacturer’s defects.
There is an additional accessory for tripod use but I did not get a chance to test it. Toward the end of the day there were times when I completely forgot I was wearing it.

With winter approaching, as I often shoot snow sports for magazines I look forward to wear this over my winter jacket while I snowboard. Skier photographers will be able to use their poles while still carrying their camera at the ready. This system has definitely revolutionized the way I carry my gear.

In conclusion, my impression of the Cotton Carrier system is highly favorable. It’s light, comfortable, efficient and once folded small enough to pack anywhere: luggage or backpack. It will definitely become an essential part of my photographic equipment. Prices start at $109. Accessories are also available.

Click this text to go to the COTTON CARRIER website