Blackmore Lake Hike

Gorgeous day for a hike. The underwood was still wet from the night rain and the woods had a distinct smell of fir and wildflowers. The trail was marked with patches of Indian Paintbrush flowers, Lupine and wild daisies. The occasional squirrel would poke its head from a tree and watched me as I hiked by. The hike to Blackmore Lake was an easy 2 miles each way (uphill one way) from the trailhead at Hyalite Reservoir, which is half hour drive from Bozeman at the end of Hyalite Canyon. This location offers a variety of activities, from fishing, to boating, camping, etc. I rode my motorcycle to the reservoir and the air was a lot cooler in the canyon than in town, making for a very pleasant ride. Blackmore Lake is pretty low right now, but in any case it’s more of a pond than a lake (when I say it for the first time I though about how Jordan Pond in Acadia National Park, Maine is actually a big lake and not a pond). A litte meadow opens up just further up from the lake, and the trail continues to Blackmore Peak, which is another 3 miles ahead. I will explore that in the future as some dark clouds in the early afternoon were calling for rain. There was not heavy traffic on this trail but I did cross a few people, and their dogs. It’s definitely a beautiful and relaxing location, and an easy spot to reach for anyone visiting Bozeman. All pictures taken with my Samsung Galaxy S6 phone. All images are clickable for larger version.

 

 

 

 

Alaska: Denali National Park

In a well rehearsed goodbye, Mt. McKinley shows its majestic body above the clouds and begs me to come back. I smile at it from my airplane seat and I feel a mix of excitement and sadness as the mountain view recedes from my eyes. My visit to Alaska was short, barely 3 days but it was intense, both on the amount of miles I covered as well as the number of wildlife I’ve seen. The experience quite unique: my first wolves sighting, grazing bull moose, grizzly cubs wrestling, rivers running toward an infinite landscape… Denali National Park conquered my heart. A park that has nothing of the fast paced, bumper-to-bumper, Yellowstone rush hours, a park that was created for nature to preserve itself rather than to become an overpopulated vacation destination. I got a taste of this immense wilderness and I’m addicted. In the next few months I know I’ll be busy planning a return, a comeback in grandeur where I’ll be able to see more, to experience more and to lose myself in a land beyond time; me and my camera. Take only pictures, leave only footprints behind.

Denali truly is a haven for a landscape, as well as a wildlife photographer. In just a day I saw more wildlife than what I’d see in Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks in a year. By mid-afternoon yesterday I watched a large number of caribou walking lazily across a valley, two rams and many sheep, two wolves, ten grizzlies, four bull moose, two golden eagles and so much more.
The mountains were hidden by what felt like perennial clouds and the rain was nearly incessant, but that made for richer greens and allowed me to take some spectacular landscape images. If you come here for a limited time, as I did, take a green bus to Wonder Lake and if you’re lucky enough your driver will give you plenty details about the place and will be capable of spotting wildlife before anyone else sees it, mine did. The bus stops whenever somebody shouts “Stop! I saw something!” and that increases the amount of time it takes to get to destination, but remember: it’s about the travel itself. With so many alert eyes on board it won’t be long before you get your chance to come home with the photograph of a bull moose or grizzly you always wanted to take. My personal recommendation is to seat on the driver’s side of the bus, heading west, as you’ll be directly facing a more dramatic landscape as well as areas where the animals are more likely to be. This was just an explorative trip for me, already knowing that I would’ve wanted to come back, and it gave me ideas of what to do next time I visit Denali; how to manage my time in the park; what to do and see and most importantly what to bring. My gear of choice this time was: my Canon 7D (I left the 5D Mark II at home as I wanted the extra reach of the 7D but didn’t want t be bothered by the weight of two bodies), Canon EF-S 10-22mm for those special landscape shots, Canon EF-100-400mm L IS, Canon EF-24-105 L IS. These two ended up being the most used lenses, particularly the 100-400 which made more than one person jealous. Sure, I was wishing I had the new Canon 800mm, but how many people can hand-hold that lens for more than 10 seconds without getting tired? (Without even considering the nearly-prohibitive price of that lens ).Also, remember that you’re on a bus for a long time, therefore you’ll have vibrations and bumps and the 100-400 is a lot easier to handle, hiking with the 800mm might not be wise. Moreover, with the 7D crop factor it becomes an actual 160-640mm lens. When the bus stops because of nearby wildlife you cannot get off as park regulations forbids that, but you can get off the bus at any other time and hike from there until you’re ready to jump back on-board, which could be an hour or a week later, according to your taste and preparation
The other accessory that has become essential to me is my Cotton Carrier, no more hiking getting bruises on my neck or back pain (read a review here). I also brought a circular warming polarizer but I never got a chance to use it. With so many wildflowers in July it’s also a good idea to bring a macro if you enjoy capturing the details of plants and flowers.

Review: Cotton Carrier

Hiking is a big part of the landscape and wildlife photographer’s life and mine but this means that we often return home with lower back pain and a chafed neck caused by the camera strap. I also find annoying having the camera hitting me  repeatedly in the stomach while I walk with the strap around my neck. My old Minolta 9Xi suffered major scratches from constantly hitting my belt. Some time ago I purchased a camera backpack which does the job of easing the carrying part, but what if the situation arises when you need your camera quickly in your hands? Take the backpack off your back, open it, remove the camera, watch the critter go, place the camera in the backpack, wear it again and keep hiking without that unique shot. I’m sure this situation is familiar to many photographers.

Fortunately, the smart people at Cotton Carrier thought of a system that allows for the camera to be in the near-ready position at all times and reducing the fatigue from carrying it around your neck. The system consists of a vest that wears comfortably under or on top of any other garment and can be fitted with a side holster (sold separately or as part of a package) that allows for carrying a second camera. I often hike with two cameras: my Canon 5D Mark II fitted with the 24-105 L and the Canon 50D (soon to be replaced by the 7D) with the 100-400 L, in this case the side holster is a welcome addition. For the times when I’m only interested in shooting landscape, I can remove the holster or, using a rubber band, I can even use it to carry a small bottle of water.
I took the Cotton Carrier out for a few test hikes and I was immediately surprised by how well it distributes the weight around the shoulders/upper back area. The vest, actually, is streamlined enough to allow the use of a backpack on top of it. For my test hikes I picked a variety of terrain: flat, uphill, downhill, in thick brush, off-trail and rocky. In all these situations the Cotton Carrier revealed itself to be of great help. In some of them, like hiking on rocky uphill terrain off the trail I’d say it was nearly essential. Not only could I stop worrying about my camera swinging around, but I was able to use both my hands to gain a solid grip on the rocks while ascending. On flat terrain I also took a test run, jogging moderately without touching the camera to see if the carrier would come in handy in that situation. Every once in a while I find myself having to run from a spot to another with the camera strap around my neck while holding it by the lens. Needless to say after a few yards the fun is over. Not only was I able to run faster with the Cotton Carrier but the weight of the camera was once again greatly minimized.
The system comes in black only, the new model has just been upgraded with a hard anodized aluminum hub (the part that gets screwed at the base of the camera) and at first is a little hard to lock but the company has informed me that after 20 or so ins and outs it will slide more smoothly; which in my experience turned out to be true . The package comes with an instruction sheet (with photos) for a step by step set-up as well as a care and maintenance sheet. It took me only minutes to set it all up and adjust it to my body without even taking a look at the instructions (but do make sure that the arrows marked on the hub points in the right direction). The vest will fit a small person as well as a large one as the straps and Velcro are highly adjustable. The system is covered by a 1 year warranty against manufacturer’s defects.
There is an additional accessory for tripod use but I did not get a chance to test it. Toward the end of the day there were times when I completely forgot I was wearing it.

With winter approaching, as I often shoot snow sports for magazines I look forward to wear this over my winter jacket while I snowboard. Skier photographers will be able to use their poles while still carrying their camera at the ready. This system has definitely revolutionized the way I carry my gear.

In conclusion, my impression of the Cotton Carrier system is highly favorable. It’s light, comfortable, efficient and once folded small enough to pack anywhere: luggage or backpack. It will definitely become an essential part of my photographic equipment. Prices start at $109. Accessories are also available.


Click this text to go to the COTTON CARRIER website

Japan Day 11 – Miyajima & Hiroshima

Beware of Deer!

Without any doubt, in this trip filled with adventures and humor, to me the evening spent in Hiroshima was the most emotionally draining part of the journey, but let’s go in order… 

Not even one minute here and I already got robbed!

After passing Osaka and Kobe the scenery changed from urban to gentle hills to urban again surrounded by tall hills and lots of green. I can never get tired of the Japanese landscape, it’s so photogenic. Arriving in Hiroshima the thing that jumped to my eyes the most was the large quantity of green spaces and the beautiful hilly background. We expected to see a regular city with tall buildings and not much else, and because of that we came with the intention of skipping the city almost entirely and head instead to the shrine island of Miyajima (also called Itsukushima). Later on we came to regret this decision as we realized that Hiroshima deserves some time to be seen and appreciated, but we made the most out of our time to see as much as we could of this city. What else can you do when you have to 15 days to visit a country that deserves a lifetime? 

The Shrine and Cherry Blossoms

At the station we hopped on a local train which took us out of the city, to the harbor , where we paid for a ferry ride to Miyajima. The ride was only just over ten minutes long, and ferries ran every fifteen minutes. Although short, the ferry ride gave me a chance to photograph the Torii of the Itsukushima Shrine from the water, using the tall hills of the island for background. This is the first view of the world famous Torii one gets as they approach the land mass, and the scenery can change drastically as the tide retreats during the day. Out of the ferry we were given maps of the island with local attractions and hiking trails. I barely made it out of the gates when a deer snatched the map out of my hands and started chewing on it, to much tourists amusement. I tried to chase it to get my map back but all I could achieve was petting it on the head. There were many deer at the dock, all seeking attention and food. Supposedly wild deer, they are so used to tourists that they behave more like domestic cats, walking slowly among the crowd and rubbing themselves on people: an attraction of their own. Many of these had their antlers cut, so not to cause damage, and I noticed a sign which read: “Do not approach deer with antlers.” We just did what million other tourists before us have done and took many photos with these unlikely pets. 

The Itsukushima Torii

Once our excitement for the animals faded a bit we walked along the shoreline toward the town center and soon arrived in front of the Torii on the water. The tide was high and it seemed as if the sacred gate was floating. On the water we could also see many poles, used for the oyster fields, another reason for which Miyajima is famous. Carts and little shops roasting and selling these delicacies were scattered around the town, so we stopped at one and took place in line to savor the seafood; these were some of the biggest oysters I had yet to see. Grilled on an open flame I had to wait a few minutes before I could eat mine, but once I did, a delicious taste filled my mouth: best oysters ever.

We visited a 5-storey Pagoda, which we had seen from the boat, and later entered a park to a trail that serves as foot access to the tallest hill of the island. There is an aerial tram that serves one of the peaks but our favorite method of locomotion is walking, and a long and steep hike it was. We crossed a few people on the way up but not as many as we expected to see; the trail climbed under a forest and next to a stream that once in a while offered some low waterfalls. A sign said that monkeys lived in the forest but we didn’t see any, what we saw was more deer, totally oblivious of us. The hike took us to an elevation of 550 meters (about 1,800 feet) and we still couldn’t see below us because of the thick woods. We arrived at a small temple, and stopped to pay our respects to the flame that, legend has it, has been burning for nearly 1000 years, kept alive by the monks. The smell of incense permeated the inside of the small dark wooded temple, making us forget the long climb and rejuvenating our spirit. Another short walk and we got to the summit, where a majestic view of the green beauty of Hiroshima Bay and the city presented itself in front of us. On the opposite side the enchantment of the Pacific Ocean and numerous islets, some inhabited some not, and more oyster poles, opened below us. All these islands, including ours, where entirely covered in a lush vegetation. It’s beautiful to see that not all places where humans have set their foot have lost their natural charm. The place presented us with more photographic opportunities and I shot a lot of memory card space using my super wide-angle. Our way down, different than the way we took to come up, wasn’t easy. If anything, it was made substantially more difficult by the effort of keeping a constant slow speed on a tortuous downhill steep path. After walking for about 9Km (5.5 miles) which felt like 20 we were once again in the village and immediately noticed how, during the hours we spent away, the tide had retreated. The big Torii wasn’t floating on the water anymore but was instead surrounded by land and many people walked to it, while many other searched the now dry seabed for mollusks filling their bags with the exquisite seafood.

Happy with the visit of this quite unique place, we waved our goodbyes from the sea to the island, the Pagoda, the Torii and the paper-eating deer. 

The Ocean and Oyster Beds

The one thing we had to visit at all costs in Hiroshima was going to close in a few hours so we rushed to its location as fast as we could: the A-Bomb Museum. The museum was created with the willingness to spread a message of peace to the world, in the hope that what happened to Hiroshima and Nagasaki would never again be repeated. Passed a bridge we arrived at the ruins of a building now known as the “A-Bomb Dome.” When the bomb exploded above the city, on that August 6th 1945, the detonation happened on top of the dome and that’s the reason why this building was nearly spared as the 

The Dome seen through the Peace Monument

detonation irradiated away from this point. The city made strong efforts to preserve it for the future generations, as a witness of what happened, even if many wanted it demolished to remove the painful memory. Today, the ruins of what used to be a beautiful building have been declared world historical patrimony. The bomb, exploded at a height of 600 meters above the city, caused the death of about 200,000 people, many of which students, as the city was a university city during the war. The museum was just ahead, a nice looking modern building of concrete and glass. Upon entering  we rented some headphones for the English translation of the displays. The main room, right after the entrance hall, offered a history of Japan in the decades that preceded the war. The rest of the visit was dotted with objects, documents, and storytelling of the 

events of that day and what followed. This was overwhelming for anyone who cares at the very least a bit about humanity. Even Lindsey became unusually quiet for the rest of the evening.
Closeup of the A-Bomb Dome

I was impressed and baffled on how the Japanese have remained objective in telling just the events without any feeling, I don’t think any other country could have managed. We slowly and quietly walked out of the museum and, except for a few comments at the moment, we never discussed it again. It’s as if the pain felt by this nation permeated our skin. I left thinking that the world would be a better place if all people of Earth visited this museum.

We walked some more under the evening lights of this beautiful city and treated ourselves to some nice Hiroshima-style Okonomiyaki before catching our train to Osaka which we rode without saying a word. We were exhausted. 

The A-Bomb Dome